Japan News Review > Japanese Political News > Japan Politics News

Monday, August 13, 2007 10:49 pm

Print This Post

Abe on Yasukuni: ‘To pay homage or not is up to the individual’

After all the 16 members of the Japanese Cabinet announced they would not visit Tokyo’s controversial Yasukuni Shrine on the August 15 anniversary of Japan’s surrender in the World War II, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe re-confirmed Monday his stance that visiting the shrine is a personal matter, not political, the Sankei Shimbun reports.

“Paying homage at the Yasukuni temple, or not, is up to the individual, even for a Cabinet member,” Abe commented. “I expect everybody to use their own discretion.“

The Prime Minister himself has refused to reveal whether or not he will visit the controversial shrine where several Japanese A-class war criminals lay buried, but a source close to the Prime Minister said last week Abe had no intention of paying homage to the shrine, according to a Kyodo News report.

Abe, who was previously be a regular worshipper at the shrine, has not went there since he took office as Prime Minister in September 2006.

Related posts

 Probe starts over margin-trading fees
 Privacy policy
 Asian Cup: Japan to put the team before the individual against Saudis
 Tokyo cinema decides against screening ‘Yasukuni’ documentary
 Ex-Prime Minister Koizumi visits Yasukuni Shrine


Japan News Review
© All rights reserved
Visited 1164 times, 1 so far today

Most read articles on Japan News Review today




Latest in Society


Latest in Business


Latest in Politics


Latest in Entertainment


Latest in Sports


Latest in Technology


Latest in Sports



AUTUMN LEAVES

Autumn leaves in Matsudo city, Chiba Prefecture.

Photo: Juyo Tanaka. Used under a Creative Commons license.


Japan Resources (external links)

Japanbilder (pictures of Japan)
The Japan Times


Featured content

Photo: Takayuki Saito. Creative Commons

Low-cost airlines making their way to Japan

FEATURE While low-cost carriers have since long been successfully operating throughout the U.S., Europe, and southern Asia, Japan has seen very little of the low-price action. Read more...